CMS guide for Samsung TVs

CMS guide for Samsung TVs

Color accuracy is one of the main reasons why we calibrate displays. When it comes to calibrating the color gamut we traditionally had 2 controls; color and tint. Years ago display manufacturers started to offer CMS, or a Color Management System. This was a huge advancement as CMS gave us control over an individual color's luminance, saturation, and hue. We could now calibrate the color gamut to be super accurate with very little errors. 

A quick lesson on color...

Color has 3 properties:

1) Luminance. How bright or dark a color is

2) Saturation. How much or how little color there is

3) Hue/tint. Ensuring that the color is the correct wavelength. For example red vs orangeish red

A proper CMS system will have 18 total controls...3 controls for each of the 6 colors (RGBCMY). 

Most TV manufactures label their CMS controls as Luminance, Saturation, and Hue, but some do things a little differently. One that comes to mind is Sharp, who labels their Luminance control as "Value". With a little trial and error most CMS systems are easy to decipher. 

The first time a new calibrator encounters a Samsung CMS system they usually end up confused and intimidated. Instead of the traditional Luminance, Saturation, Hue model, Samsung labels their CMS controls as Red, Green, and Blue. Which one of these controls changes Luminance? Saturation? Hue? 

This guide will help you navigate Samsung's CMS system and calibrate the color gamut in the most efficient way possible. As you read this, use the attached a CIE chart as a visual reference. 

NOTE: The controls for the primary colors work differently than the secondary colors. Pay close attention to this or you can easily make things unnecessarily hard on yourself!

RED

Red is the luminance control. Turning this up will make red brighter. Turning it down will make red darker. In CalMAN, keep an eye on the Delta L graph and the Gamut Luminance graph. Ideally these would both be at the zero mark.

Green is a hue control. Adding green to red will move the dot along the perimeter of the color space triangle towards green. Removing green from red will move the dot in the opposite direction away from green. In CalMAN, watch the position of the dot and the Delta H graph. Ideally the dot will be on target and the Delta H graph will be at the zero mark.

Blue is also a hue control. Adding blue to red will move the dot along the perimeter of the color space triangle towards blue. Removing blue from red will move the dot in the opposite direction away from blue. Ideally the dot will be on target and the Delta H graph will be at the zero mark.

Using green in conjunction with blue will act as a saturation control. For example, adding 5 clicks of green and 5 clicks of blue to red will desaturate red. Ideally the dot will be on target and the Delta C graph will be at the zero mark.

GREEN

Green is the luminance control. Turning this up will make green brighter. Turning it down will make green darker. In CalMAN, keep an eye on the Delta L graph and the Gamut Luminance graph. Ideally these would both be at the zero mark

Red is a hue control. Adding red to green will move the dot along the perimeter of the color space triangle towards red. Removing red from green will move the dot in the opposite direction away from red. In CalMAN, watch the position of the dot and the Delta H graph. Ideally the dot will be on target and the Delta H graph will be at the zero mark.

Blue is also a hue control. Adding blue to green will move the dot along the perimeter of the color space triangle towards blue. Removing blue from green will move the dot away from blue. Ideally the dot will be on target and the Delta H graph will be at the zero mark.

Using red in conjunction with blue will act as a saturation control. For example, adding 5 clicks of red and 5 clicks of blue to red will desaturate green. Ideally the dot will be on target and the Delta C graph will be at the zero mark.

BLUE

Blue is the luminance control. Turning this up will make blue brighter. Turning it down will make blue darker. In CalMAN, keep an eye on the Delta L graph and the Gamut Luminance graph. Ideally these would both be at the zero mark.

Red is a hue control. Adding red to blue will move the dot along the perimeter of the color space triangle towards red. Removing red from blue will move the dot in the opposite direction away from red. In CalMAN, watch the position of the dot and the Delta H graph. Ideally the dot will be on target and the Delta H graph will be at the zero mark.

Green is also a hue control. Adding green to blue will move the dot along the perimeter of the color space triangle towards green. Removing green from blue will move the dot in the opposite direction away from green. Ideally the dot will be on target and the Delta H graph will be at the zero mark.

Using red in conjunction with green will act as a saturation control. For example, adding 5 clicks of red and 5 clicks of green to blue will desaturate blue. Ideally the dot will be on target and the Delta C graph will be at the zero mark.

The controls for the secondary colors work in a slightly different way. 

CYAN

Take a look at which 2 primary colors are combined to make Cyan. 

Green in conjunction with blue is the luminance control. For example, adding 5 clicks of green and 5 clicks of blue to cyan will make cyan brighter. Removing 5 clicks of green and 5 clicks of blue from cyan will make cyan darker. In CalMAN, keep an eye on the Delta L graph and the Gamut Luminance graph. Ideally these would both be at the zero mark.

Green is a hue control. Adding green to cyan will move the dot along the perimeter of the color space triangle towards green. Removing green from cyan will move the dot in the opposite direction towards blue. Ideally the dot will be on target and the Delta H graph will be at the zero mark.

Blue is also a hue control. Adding blue to cyan will move the dot along the perimeter of the color space triangle towards blue. Removing blue from cyan will move the dot in the opposite direction towards green. Ideally the dot will be on target and the Delta H graph will be at the zero mark.

Take a look at the CIE chart. If you were to draw a straight line from cyan through white, which primary color would you end up at? Red!

Red is the saturation control for cyan. Adding red to cyan will pull the dot in towards white which would desaturate cyan. Ideally the dot will be on target and the Delta C graph will be at the zero mark.

MAGENTA

Take a look at which 2 primary colors are combined to make magenta. 

Blue in conjunction with red is the luminance control. For example, adding 5 clicks of blue and 5 clicks of red to magenta will make magenta brighter. Removing 5 clicks of blue and 5 clicks of red from magenta will make magenta darker. In CalMAN, keep an eye on the Delta L graph and the Gamut Luminance graph. Ideally these would both be at the zero mark.

Red is a hue control. Adding red to magenta will move the dot along the perimeter of the color space triangle towards red. Removing red from magenta will move the dot in the opposite direction towards blue. Ideally the dot will be on target and the Delta H graph will be at the zero mark.

Blue is also a hue control. Adding blue to magenta will move the dot along the perimeter of the color space triangle towards blue. Removing blue from magenta will move the dot in the opposite direction towards red. Ideally the dot will be on target and the Delta H graph will be at the zero mark.

Take a look at the CIE chart. If you were to draw a straight line from magenta through white, which primary color would you end up at? Green!

Green is the saturation control for magenta. Adding green to magenta will pull the dot in towards white which would desaturate magenta. Ideally the dot will be on target and the Delta C graph will be at the zero mark.

YELLOW

Take a look at which 2 primary colors are combined to make yellow. 

Green in conjunction with red is the luminance control. For example, adding 5 clicks of green and 5 clicks of red to yellow will make yellow brighter. Removing 5 clicks of green and 5 clicks of red from yellow will make yellow darker. In CalMAN, keep an eye on the Delta L graph and the Gamut Luminance graph. Ideally these would both be at the zero mark.

Red is a hue control. Adding red to yellow will move the dot along the perimeter of the color space triangle towards red. Removing red from yellow will move the dot in the opposite direction towards green. Ideally the dot will be on target and the Delta H graph will be at the zero mark.

Green is also a hue control. Adding green to yellow will move the dot along the perimeter of the color space triangle towards green. Removing green from yellow will move the dot in the opposite direction towards red. Ideally the dot will be on target and the Delta H graph will be at the zero mark.

Take a look at the CIE chart. If you were to draw a straight line from yellow through white, which primary color would you end up at? Blue!

Blue is the saturation control for yellow. Adding blue to yellow will pull the dot in towards white which would desaturate yellow. Ideally the dot will be on target and the Delta C graph will be at the zero mark.

That's it!

Sometimes when working on secondary colors you can take care of 2 errors at once. For example, let's say that magenta is too red and too bright. If you add blue you will take care of the hue error as the dot will move along the perimeter of the color space triangle towards the magenta target. When you add enough blue you will eventually end up on target and the Delta H will be zero. Sounds good right? Well, you have fixed the hue error, but unfortunately because blue was added, magenta is now even brighter than what you started with. This makes the Delta L even worse! Instead of adding blue, I would recommend removing red from magenta. This will move the dot to it's target, and because red has been removed, magenta will get darker. You have now fixed the hue and luminance error with one control!

Once you get the hang of the Samsung CMS menu it's actually quite intuitive. You are simply using the controls to move the dot toward the target and getting the luminance correct. Remember what you learned during ISF class...Evaluate, Learn, and Verify!

PRO TIPS

1) Once a color has been calibrated, look at the Delta E 2000 value in CalMAN (located on the CMS page). The lower the better, but anything below 3 is considered within most human's visual perception. Anything below 1 is considered an invisible error.

2) When calibrating a primary color, the luminance is the most important parameter to calibrate correctly. 

3) When calibrating a secondary color, the tint/hue is the most important parameter to calibrate correctly.

4) Any time you calibrate color, whether it's color/tint or CMS, you MUST look at content for a visual confirmation. I recommend looking at skin tones, especially the Portrait Displays 5 people and/or the ISF 3 girls. Both can be found on the Murideo Six G, and I have attached the images for reference. I have also attached the Portrait Displays 5 people white paper which describes exactly what to look for in the image. 

5) Some TVs have CMS systems that unfortunately do not work. First try updating the firmware on the TV and try the CMS controls again. If CMS still does not work, DO NOT use it! Simply reset the CMS values back to their factory positions. 

6) If you run into a situation where CMS is broken, leave it alone and stick with adjusting color/tint. Use the TVs built in "blue only" mode on top of the SMPTE color bars (found on the Murideo Six G). If the TV does not have a "blue only" mode, use the Portrait Displays 5 people image and/or the ISF 3 girls and adjust color/tint by eye.

If you have further questions feel free to reply to this thread or you can always send me a message at jason@avproglobal.com

Happy calibrating!

EDIT: because the file sizes are too big for the forums, click here for the reference material that I mentioned throughout this guide. Thanks!